FE Electrical – FAQs

What is the FE Exam retake policy?

You can retake the exam once throughout every 2 month-period, and up to three times a year.

How long should you study for the FE Exam?

Every student varies in how much they need to study. However, based on our research, the average passing student studies around 200-400 hours, which is usually distributed as around 3-4 hours a day for 3 months. You can take a look at our blog for more details.

 

Why take the FE Exam? Is the FE Exam worth it?

  • It is the first step to PE Licensure, which allows you to become a licensed engineer in the US and can greatly enhance your career prospects.
  • Certain jobs either require completion or reward completion of the FE Exam with improved salaries.
  • The sooner you take the exam, the easier and more beneficial it’ll be.

How hard is the FE Exam? How difficult is the FE Exam?

The FE Exam has 110 questions that need to be completed in under 5 hours and 20 minutes. Although that content itself is not widely considered to be difficult, the broad scope of topics can make the exam quite challenging. Additionally, the sooner you take the exam, the easier it will be to pass.

 

What score do you need to pass the FE Exam? What is the passing grade for the FE Exam?

As of January 2021, the passing rate for the FE Electrical and Computer Exam was 72%. This, however is a percentile scoring system which means that 72% of the people that took the exam on that date passed.

As a guideline to aid your preparation, you should roughly aim to get at least 65-70 questions out of the 110 correct to be in a safe position for passing.

 

What can you bring with you to the FE Exam?

  1. ID
  2. An NCEES Approved Calculator (link to blog).
  3. Locker Key (Food and drink can be stored in lockers outside the testing room, locker is accessible during breaks)
  4. Face Mask during Covid-19

 

What are FE Exam requirements by state?

If you live in the US, you can refer to this list below for your state’s engineering board’s website:

Alabama: www.bels.alabama.gov

Alaska: https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/cbpl/ProfessionalLicensing/BoardofArchitectsEngineersandLandSurveyors.aspx

Arizona: www.azbtr.gov

Arkansas: www.arkansas.gov/pels

California: www.pels.ca.gov

Colorado: www.dora.state.co.us/aes

Connecticut: www.ct.gov/dcp

Delaware: www.dape.org

District of Columbia: www.pearsonvue.com/dc/engineers

Florida: www.fbpe.org

Georgia: www.sos.ga.gov/plb/pels

Hawaii: www.hawaii.gov/dcca/pvl

Idaho: www.ipels.idaho.gov

Illinois: www.idfpr.com/dpr/WHO/pe.asp

Indiana: www.pla.in.gov

Iowa: www.plb.iowa.gov/board/engineers-land-surveyors

Kansas: www.ksbtp.ks.gov/professions/engineers

Kentucky: https://kyboels.ky.gov/Pages/default.aspx

Louisiana: www.lapels.com

Maine: www.maine.gov/professionalengineers/

Maryland: www.dllr.state.md.us

Massachusetts: www.mass.gov/licensing-of-professional-engineers-and-land-surveyors

Michigan: www.michigan.gov/engineers

Minnesota: www.aelslagid.state.mn.us

Mississippi: www.pepls.state.ms.us

Missouri: pr.mo.gov/apelsla.asp

Montana: https://boards.bsd.dli.mt.gov/professional-engineers-land-surveyors/

Nebraska: www.ea.ne.gov

Nevada: www.nvboe.org/

New Hampshire: www.nh.gov/jtboard/home.htm

New Jersey: www.state.nj.us/lps/ca/nonmedical/pels.htm

New Mexico: www.sblpes.state.nm.us

New York: www.op.nysed.gov/prof/pels/

North Carolina: www.ncbels.org

North Dakota: www.ndpelsboard.org

Ohio: www.peps.ohio.gov

Oklahoma: www.pels.ok.gov

Oregon: www.oregon.gov/osbeels

Pennsylvania: www.dos.state.pa.us/eng

Rhode Island: www.bdp.state.ri.us

South Carolina: www.llr.state.sc.us/pol/engineers

South Dakota: www.dlr.sd.gov/bdcomm/btp/engineers.aspx

Tennessee: www.tn.gov/commerce/boards/ae/

Texas: www.tbpe.state.tx.us

Vermont: www.vtprofessionals.org

Virginia: www.vtprofessionals.org

Washington: www.dol.wa.gov/business/engineerslandsurveyors/

West Virgina: www.wvpebd.org

Wisconsin: drl.wi.gov

Wyoming: engineersandsurveyors.wy.gov

 

What to do after passing the FE Exam?

Depending on the state you live in, you may have to visit the state board’s website (link to blog) and fill out a form to receive the Engineer-in-Training (EIT) certification.

What the FE Exam’s rules?

  • 110 questions to be solved in 5 hours and 20 minutes. Around 55 in the first section, followed by a 25 minute break and then around 55 in the second section.
  • You can go back to a previous question only within the current section. Once you’re in section 2, you cannot go back to section 1.
  • The only reference material you have access to during the exam is the NCEES FE Reference Handbook that will appear on the left side of the screen.
  • The only items you can bring to the testing room is an ID, an NCEES approved calculator, locker key, and a face mask.

 

What changed in the July 2020 FE Exam update?

A number of changes were made to the FE Electrical and Computer Exam sections:

  • Mathematics: Added ordinary differential equations
  • Probability and Statistics: Removed point and confidence intervals, removed conditional probability.
  • Engineering Economics and Ethics: Added safety topics
  • Properties of Electrical Materials: Removed mechanical and chemical topics. Added semiconductor materials.
  • Engineering Sciences: Section Removed
  • Linear Systems: Removed 2-port theory
  • Signal processing: Removed convolution, difference equations, Z-transforms
  • Electronics: Removed Solid-state fundamentals
  • Electromagnetics: Removed electromagnetic compatibility
  • Control Systems: Removed root locus and state variables
  • Computer Networks: Added network intrusion detection and prevention
  • Digital Systems: Removed data path/controller design
  • Computer Systems: Removed architecture
  • Software: Removed software design methods
  • Engineering Economics, Circuit Analysis, Power Systems, Communications: No changes